Back for your viewing pleasure is the race car driver Danica Patrick. She may not have had a lot of success on the racing circuit, but she sure is nice to look at.

Danica Patrick

Click on the thumbnails below to view a larger sized picture.

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

Danica Patrick

~Boo


 


Not only is our Bad Hot of the Day drop dead gorgeous, but she was also a star volleyball player that got to play for the Junior Olympics team and she was also a model before she tried her hand at acting. She could very well be the most perfect woman on Earth…look at her lovely pictures below if you don’t believe me.

Taylor Cole

By clicking on her thumbnails, you can view her pictures in large size below.

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

Taylor Cole

~Boo


 


No stranger to controversy, U.S. retailer Abercrombie & Fitch has come under fire for offering a push-up bikini top to young girls.

Its “Ashley” bikini — described as “padded” and a “push-up” — was posted on the Abercrombie Kids website earlier this week.

The company declined to comment Saturday but noted it has since updated the description of its bikini online.

The product is now being offered as a padded, “striped triangle.” Bottoms are sold separately.

“How is this okay for a second-grader?” asked Rebecca Odes in a recent post on the Babble parenting blog.

“Playing at sexy is an inevitable and important part of growing up. But there’s a difference between exploring these ideas on your own and having them sold to you in a children’s catalog,” she wrote.

Gail Dines, a sociology professor at Wheelock College in Boston, similarly slammed the top, saying it would encourage girls to think about themselves in a sexual way before they are ready.

“It (also) sends out really bad signals to adult men about young girls being appropriate sexual objects,” she told CNN affiliate WHDH.

This is not the first time the company, known for its sexy style of marketing campaigns, has found itself in hot water with consumers.

In 2002, the retailer pulled controversial T-shirts after complaints they were racially insensitive. One shirt showed Chinese laundry workers with conical hats and the phrase, “Wong Brothers Laundry Service: Two Wongs Can Make It White.”

In 2003, the company — under pressure from some consumer groups — said it would stop issuing racy catalogues and halt the publication of its holiday book, which featured nude young adult models in sexually suggestive poses.

~Boo

 

Massachusetts public health officials are calming concerns after a test of rainwater in Boston last week found radiation from Japan’s distressed nuclear power plant has made it to the Northeast.

John Auerback, from the Department of Public Health said, “there are no anticipated public health concerns associated with this finding.”

He said, even if you drank the contaminated rainwater you’d see no health effects.

“It is still 25 times less risky than it would need to be in order to cause any health concerns.”

The amount of radiation detected is similar to what passed through the area after the partial meltdown of the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in 1979.

Still, Massachusetts health officials are stepping up the monitoring of air samples, reservoirs and other public drinking water supplies.

But they stress, that is just to be on the safe side.

The Commissioner of the Department of Environmental Protection said, “I want to underline, we’re doing this testing out of an abundance of caution. We don’t believe there is a problem. None of the data we’ve seen indicates there is.”

~Boo

 

Jaclyn Swedberg

Check out this gorgeous girl’s other pictures below, and you can view supersize photo by clicking on the image. Also, we have a link to a book produced by Hugh Hefner which contains the playmate centerfolds from 1953 through 2007 (over 600 historical beauties).

Jaclyn Swedberg

Jaclyn Swedberg

Jaclyn Swedberg

 


Ken Lanci, described as a self-made millionaire, owns a contract to buy tickets through a private seat license to Cleveland Browns games. Since the lockout means there might not be games for him to buy these tickets to, he’s suing for breach of contract, bad faith counts, and alleged contract interference. The basis of the suit revolves around, as it claims, that the NFL and the other 31 teams “conspired with the Browns and one another to lock out the players, without justification, resulting in the Browns’ breach of the PSL agreement”.

The case is seeking more than $50,000 in restitution and is set to go before Judge John P. O’Donnell. The NFL has four weeks to respond to the suit.

Now, not all of us have the money to hire a lawyer willing to sue the NFL. But wouldn’t it be awesome if something like this spiraled into a class action suit where fans could sign on as additional plaintiffs? I presume only those with an actual investment in a season, a la season tickets, would be able to join in- I can’t imagine there’s legal ground to simply say “but I wanna see football and this stinks!”. But just imagine if only half of the NFL’s season ticket holders actually joined in on something like that… boy, I bet the CBA would be resolved really quickly at that point, seeing as how the whole thing could theoretically be tossed out of court should a full season happen and no actual damages occur.

~Boo

 


God had a wife, Asherah, whom the Book of Kings suggests was worshiped alongside Yahweh in his temple in Israel, according to an Oxford scholar.

In 1967, Raphael Patai was the first historian to mention that the ancient Israelites worshiped both Yahweh and Asherah. The theory has gained new prominence due to the research of Francesca Stavrakopoulou, who began her work at Oxford and is now a senior lecturer in the department of Theology and Religion at the University of Exeter.

Information presented in Stavrakopoulou’s books, lectures and journal papers has become the basis of a three-part documentary series, now airing in Europe, where she discusses the Yahweh-Asherah connection.

“You might know him as Yahweh, Allah or God. But on this fact, Jews, Muslims and Christians, the people of the great Abrahamic religions, are agreed: There is only one of Him,” writes Stavrakopoulou in a statement released to the British media. “He is a solitary figure, a single, universal creator, not one God among many … or so we like to believe.”

“After years of research specializing in the history and religion of Israel, however, I have come to a colorful and what could seem, to some, uncomfortable conclusion that God had a wife,” she added.

Stavrakopoulou bases her theory on ancient texts, amulets and figurines unearthed primarily in the ancient Canaanite coastal city called Ugarit, now modern-day Syria. All of these artifacts reveal that Asherah was a powerful fertility goddess.

Asherah’s connection to Yahweh, according to Stavrakopoulou, is spelled out in both the Bible and an 8th century B.C. inscription on pottery found in the Sinai desert at a site called Kuntillet Ajrud.

“The inscription is a petition for a blessing,” she shares. “Crucially, the inscription asks for a blessing from ‘Yahweh and his Asherah.’ Here was evidence that presented Yahweh and Asherah as a divine pair. And now a handful of similar inscriptions have since been found, all of which help to strengthen the case that the God of the Bible once had a wife.”

Also significant, Stavrakopoulou believes, “is the Bible’s admission that the goddess Asherah was worshiped in Yahweh’s Temple in Jerusalem. In the Book of Kings, we’re told that a statue of Asherah was housed in the temple and that female temple personnel wove ritual textiles for her.”

J. Edward Wright, president of both The Arizona Center for Judaic Studies and The Albright Institute for Archaeological Research, told Discovery News that he agrees several Hebrew inscriptions mention “Yahweh and his Asherah.”

“Asherah was not entirely edited out of the Bible by its male editors,” he added. “Traces of her remain, and based on those traces, archaeological evidence and references to her in texts from nations bordering Israel and Judah, we can reconstruct her role in the religions of the Southern Levant.”

Asherah — known across the ancient Near East by various other names, such as Astarte and Istar — was “an important deity, one who was both mighty and nurturing,” Wright continued.

“Many English translations prefer to translate ‘Asherah’ as ‘Sacred Tree,’” Wright said. “This seems to be in part driven by a modern desire, clearly inspired by the Biblical narratives, to hide Asherah behind a veil once again.”

“Mentions of the goddess Asherah in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) are rare and have been heavily edited by the ancient authors who gathered the texts together,” Aaron Brody, director of the Bade Museum and an associate professor of Bible and archaeology at the Pacific School of Religion, said.

Asherah as a tree symbol was even said to have been “chopped down and burned outside the Temple in acts of certain rulers who were trying to ‘purify’ the cult, and focus on the worship of a single male god, Yahweh,” he added.

The ancient Israelites were polytheists, Brody told Discovery News, “with only a small minority worshiping Yahweh alone before the historic events of 586 B.C.” In that year, an elite community within Judea was exiled to Babylon and the Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed. This, Brody said, led to “a more universal vision of strict monotheism: one god not only for Judah, but for all of the nations.”

~Boo

 




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