Today’s bad hot of the day is the young sports illustrated cover model Kate Upton. She is definitely a sight to behold.

Kate Upton

Be sure to click the thumbnails below so you can view the pictures in their full size.

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Kate Upton


“Obama’s giveaway: Oil-rich islands to Russia”

The seven endangered islands in the Arctic Ocean and Bering Sea include one the size of Rhode Island and Delaware combined. The Russians are also to get the tens of thousands of square miles of oil-rich seabeds surrounding the islands. The Department of Interior estimates billions of barrels of oil are at stake.

The State Department has undertaken the giveaway in the guise of a maritime boundary agreement between Alaska and Siberia. Astoundingly our federal government itself drew the line to put these seven Alaskan islands on the Russian side. But as an executive agreement it could be reversed with the stroke of a pen by President Obama or Secretary Clinton.

The agreement was negotiated in total secrecy. The state of Alaska was not allowed to participate in the negotiations nor was the public given any opportunity for comment. This is despite the fact the Alaska Legislature has passed resolutions of opposition – but the State Department doesn’t seem to care.”

Joe Miller was the 2010 Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate from Alaska. He is a West Point graduate and decorated combat veteran from the first Gulf War. A former judgeJoe graduated from Yale Law School and was later awarded an advanced economics degree from the University of Alaska. He is presently chairman of Restoring Liberty Alaska PAC and Restoring Liberty Action Committee.

 


Former American President Dwight D. Eisenhower had three secret meetings with aliens, a former US government consultant has claimed.

The 34th President of the United States met the extra terrestrials at a remote air base in New Mexico in 1954, according to lecturer and author Timothy Good.

Eisenhower and other FBI officials are said to have organised the showdown with the space creatures by sending out ‘telepathic messages’.

The two parties finally met up on three separate occasions at the Holloman Air Force base and there were ‘many witnesses’.

Conspiracy theorists have circulated increased rumours in recent months that the meeting between the Commander-in-Chief and people from another planet took place.

But the claims from Mr Good, a former U.S. Congress and Pentagon consultant, are the first to be made publicly by a prominent academic.

Speaking on Frank Skinner’s BBC2 current affairs show Opinionated, he said that governments around the world have been in regular contact with aliens for many decades.

‘Aliens have made both formal and informal contact with thousands of people throughout the world from all walks of life,’ he added.

Asked why the aliens don’t go to somebody ‘important’ like Barack Obama, he said: ‘Well, certainly I can tell you that in 1954, President Eisenhower had three encounters, set up meetings with aliens, which took place at certain Air Force bases including Holloman Air Force base in New Mexico.’

He added that there were ‘many witnesses’.

Eisenhower, who was president from 1953 to 1961, is known to have had a strong belief in life on other planets.

Extra-terrestrial: Eisenhower, who was president from 1953 to 1961, is known to have had a strong belief in life on other planets

The former five-star general in the United States Army who commanded the Allied Forces in Europe during the Second World War, was also keen on pushing the U.S. space programme.

His meeting with the cosmic life forms is said to have taken place while officials were told that he was on vacation in Palm Springs, California, in February 1954.

The initial meeting is supposed to have taken place with aliens who were ‘Nordic’ in appearance, but the agreement was eventually ‘signed’ with a race called ‘Alien Greys’.

Mr Good added: ‘We know that up to 90 per cent of all UFO reports can be explained in conventional terms. However, I would say millions of people worldwide have actually seen the real thing.’

According to classified documents released by the Ministry of Defence in 2010, Winston Churchill may have ordered a UFO sighting to be kept secret.

The UFO was seen over the East Coast of England by an RAF reconnaissance plane returning from a mission in France or Germany towards the end of the war.

Churchill is said to have discussed how to deal with UFO sightings with Eisenhower.

Tagged with:
 

USB Stick Sequences DNA in Seconds


It may look like an ordinary USB memory stick, but a little gadget that can sequence DNA while plugged into your laptop could have far-reaching effects on medicine and genetic research.

The UK firm Oxford Nanopore built the device, called MinION, and claims it can sequence simple genomes – like those of some viruses and bacteria – in a matter of seconds. More complex genomes would take longer, but MinION could also be useful for obtaining quick results in sequencing DNA from cells in a biopsy to look for cancer, for example, or to determine the genetic identity of bone fragments at an archaeological dig.

The company demonstrated today at the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) conference in Marco Island, Florida, that MinION has sequenced a simple virus called Phi X, which contains 5000 genetic base pairs.

This is merely a proof of principle – “Phi X was the first DNA genome to be sequenced ever,” says Nick Loman, a bioinformatician at the Pallen research group at the University of Birmingham, UK, and author of the blog Pathogens: Genes and Genomes. But it shows for the first time that this technology works, he says. “If you can sequence this genome you should be able to sequence larger genomes.”

Oxford Nanopore is also building a larger device, GridION, for lab use. Both GridION and MinION operate using the same technology: DNA is added to a solution containing enzymes that bind to the end of each strand. When a current is applied across the solution these enzymes and DNA are drawn to hundreds of wells in a membrane at the bottom of the solution, each just 10 micrometres in diameter.

Within each well is a modified version of the protein alpha hemolysin (AHL), which has a hollow tube just 10 nanometres wide at its core. As the DNA is drawn to the pore the enzyme attaches itself to the AHL and begins to unzip the DNA, threading one strand of the double helix through the pore. The unique electrical characteristics of each base disrupt the current flowing through each pore, enough to determine which of the four bases is passing through it. Each disruption is read by the device, like a tickertape reader.

This approach has two key advantages over other sequencing techniques: first, the DNA does not need to be amplified – a time-consuming process that replicates the DNA in a sample to make it abundant enough to make a reliable measurement.

Second, the devices can sequence DNA strands as long as 10,000 bases continuously, whereas most other techniques require the DNA to be sheared into smaller fragments of at most a few hundred bases. This means that once they have been read they have to be painstakingly reassembled by software like pieces of a jigsaw. “We just read the entire thing in one go,” as with Phi X, says Clive Brown, Oxford Nanopore’s chief technology officer.

But Oxford Nanopore will face stiff competition. Jonathan Rothberg, a scientist and entrepreneur who founded rival firm 454 Life Sciences, also announced at the AGBT conference that his start-up company, Ion Torrent, will be launching a desktop sequencing machine. Dubbed the Ion Proton, it identifies bases by using transistors to detect hydrogen ions as they are given off during the polymerisation of DNA.

This device will be capable of sequencing a human genome in 2 hours for around $1000, Rothberg claims. Nanopores are an “elegant” technology, he says, but Ion Torrent already has a foot in the door. “As we saw last summer with the E. coli outbreak in Germany, people are already now using it,” he says.

By contrast, the MinION would take about 6 hours to complete a human genome, Brown claims, though the company plans to market the device for use in shorter sequencing tasks like identifying pathogens, or screening for genetic mutations that can increase risk of certain diseases. Each unit is expected to cost $900 when it goes on sale later this year.

“The biggest strength of nanopore sequencing is that it generates very long reads, which has been a limitation for most other technologies,” says Loman. If the costs, quality, ease of use and throughput can be brought in line with other instruments, it will be a “killer technology” for sequencing, he says.

As for clinical applications, David Rasko at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, says the MinION could have huge benefits. “It may have serious implications for public health and it could really change the way we do medicine,” he says. “You can see every physician walking around the hospital with a pocketful of these things.” And it will likely increase the number of scientists generating sequencing data by making the technology cheaper and more accessible, he says.

 

Tasmanian Devil Vaccine


A bizarre facial cancer threatening to wipe out the Tasmanian devil probably evolved from a single female about 16 years ago, new scans of the cancer reveal. The scans are also helping to identify gene mutations found in the cancer but not healthy tissue, which might provide targets for a vaccine to rescue the endangered species.

Devil facial tumour disease is unusual in that the cancer cells themselves act as infectious agents. The cells spread between animals through biting during fights or mating. A vaccine could prime uninfected animals against the cancer if they are subsequently bitten.

“Now we know which genes are mutated, we can begin assessing which ones might be good antigens for a vaccine,” says Elizabeth Murchison of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton, UK, who led the team.

After analysing DNA from 104 tumours in 69 devils, Murchison found that all of them trace back to a single female – dubbed the “immortal devil”. This animal must have been the first to develop the cancer, around 16 years ago.

She passed it on by biting other devils, and the cancer then spread through the entire population, which has seen declines of 80 per cent in affected areas.

“It’s one cancer, in one devil, and has now spread through the population, like it has metastasised,” says Murchison. “That devil lived on the east coast of Tasmania, and although she’s dead, her cancer lives on in thousands of devils in Tasmania today, which is why I call her the immortal devil.”

As well as revealing possible leads for vaccines, the study revealed how the original cancer has evolved. In the Forestier peninsula in the south-east of Tasmania, for example, there’s evidence that one variety of the cancer disappeared and another became dominant in its place.

Tracing how the cancer is evolving might help predict how it will spread when it reaches unaffected areas, says Murchison.

Murchison and her colleagues also found evidence of mutations in immunity genes within the cancer, which could help explain why the immune systems of newly infected animals don’t recognise tumours as “foreign” and kill them off.

Other researchers have suggested that extensive inbreeding might explain how the cancers evade destruction, because they are mistaken for part of the animal’s normal tissue. However, Murchison said that a study by researchers at the University of Tasmania appeared to rule out the inbreeding hypothesis by showing that skin grafts between devils were rapidly attacked and eliminated.

“Having the genome should also allow us to identify cancer-causing genes, and hopefully find drugs that may help to control the disease,” says Katherine Belov, an authority on Tasmanian devils at the University of Sydney, who was not involved in the study.

“There is some early evidence that the disease is behaving differently in devils in north-west Tasmanian populations,” says Belov. “The disease there is affecting fewer devils and taking longer to kill them off, and at this stage we don’t know whether that’s because the devils there are more resistant, or the tumour strains are different, or both,” she says. “Genomics will help us to solve this.”

Murchison says that although the research is focused on the devils, the knowledge gained may be valuable if a similar disease ever emerges in humans. The only other known cancer infectious in this way is a venereal disease in dogs.

Tagged with:
 


Today’s bad hot of the day is pga golfer Natalie Gulbis wearing nothing but her body paint. When you think of athlete’s with nearly flawless bodies, she is one of the first that comes to mind.

Natalie Gulbis

Be sure to click the thumbnails below to view her additional pictures in all their glory.

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis

Natalie Gulbis


With Iranians on the path to nuclear weapons and communist Putin still ruling with an iron fist, the last thing you would think a president of the United States would want to do is to drastically reduce the USA’s nuclear arsenal. I guess Obama doesn’t adhere to one of the greatest president’s philosophy of all time, “Peace through strength”.

I guess he wasn’t kidding when he said he was going to transform American in a big way. Little did anyone know that his idea of change was to turn it into a more socialistic weak country.

There are some things happening today that are downright scary. The regime, led by Barack Hussein Obama, is weighing options for reducing our US nuclear force, including a reduction of up to 80% in the number of deployed warheads — 80%. Folks, this is staggering. Meanwhile, the Iranians are nuking up. Iran announced today that they’re gonna cut off oil to six countries that have opposed its nuclear program, and more importantly, Iran also announced that they have installed domestically made nuclear fuel rods in their Tehran reactor.

Now, if that’s true, this is significant because the sanctions that are currently imposed on them are supposed to prevent them from getting the material that you need to make nuclear rods. And, also, if this is true, it puts Iran that much closer to being able to make a nuclear weapon. We’re unilaterally disarming. We are not requiring the Russians to go along and, even if the Russians said they would match these reductions, they lie. That is the lesson of the Russians and nukes. What was our top moment? Our number of warheads peaked at 12,000 in the late eighties. And let me tell you something. That number of nuclear warheads is what helped us win the Cold War. That number of nuclear warheads sent a message to every other nation, particularly at that point in time, the Soviet Union, “You hit us, it doesn’t matter. We’ve got enough left to wipe you out in retaliation.” That many nuclear warheads was a deterrent.

So much is flashing back to me. You go back to the eighties and the seventies, the nuclear freeze movement, the peaceniks wanted to get rid of nukes, and there was an arms race going on. We were increasing our stockpile, as were the Russians. The numbers mattered only in terms of deterrent. We had to keep up, and we had to stay ahead. You build, for example, the B-2 bomber, hoping never to have to use it. The left has never understood this about military matters and defense. They never understood this about nukes. You build them so that you don’t have to use them. That’s the point. You don’t build them because you want to. You don’t build them because you can’t wait to use them. You don’t build them because you’re warmongers. You build them so that you don’t have to. It’s what’s behind practically every major weapon invention and manufacture.

The B-2 stealth bomber, you hope you never have to use it. Now, we have had to, obviously. But the hope is that the brute force and the ability to project power is enough to deter anybody from taking us on. It’s a great strategy, it is how this stuff works, and now Barack Obama is reducing our stockpile unilaterally by 80%, back to 300 warheads. Now, you might say, “Well, that’s good, Rush, it’s making the world safer.” It is not making the world safer. If the Russians still have 15,000 or 2,000, whatever the number is, folks, there’s a balance of power here that has shifted away from us, and this — I am here to tell you — is by design.

 


“The rate of unemployment in the United States has exceeded 8 percent since February 2009, making the past three years the longest stretch of high unemployment in this country since the Great Depression. Moreover, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects that the unemployment rate will remain above 8 percent until 2014.

The official unemployment rate excludes those individuals who would like to work but have not searched for a job in the past four weeks as well as those who are working part-time but would prefer full-time work; if those people were counted among the unemployed, the unemployment rate in January 2012 would have been about 15 percent.

Compounding the problem of high unemployment, the share of unemployed people looking for work for more than six months—referred to as the long-term unemployed—topped 40 percent in December 2009 for the first time since 1948, when such data began to be collected; it has remained above that level ever since.”

Tagged with:
 

Some Organic Foods Laced with Arsenic


As virtuous as you might feel when you choose organic foods sweetened with brown rice syrup instead of high-fructose corn syrup, you might actually be making a potentially toxic decision.

Infant formulas, cereal bars and other foods made with organic brown rice syrup are loaded with arsenic, found a new study. And while an occasional rice-sweetened energy bar probably won’t make much of a difference to your health, potential risks are greatest for babies, people with gluten intolerance and others who eat rice-heavy diets.

The findings suggest the need for regulations on arsenic in food, which so far, the United States Food and Drug Administration does not do.

“Here is just another food type that no one would consider would contain arsenic, and yet it does,” said Brian Jackson, an environmental chemist at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. “We really have no guidelines on what maximum levels should be for arsenic in food. Maybe it’s time this was considered.”

Arsenic, which is naturally ubiquitous in the environment and also a result of human activities, is a known carcinogen that, with enough daily exposure over years or decades, can also cause circulatory problems, type 2 diabetes, asthma and cardiovascular disease, among other ills.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates exposure to the mineral, but only through public supplies of drinking water, which cannot contain more than 10 parts per billion of arsenic.

Only in the last couple of years have scientists realized that food, too, often contains arsenic. Studies have found the highest levels in fruit juices, rice and rice products, including crackers, rice milk and cereals made for both adults and babies.

At the supermarket one day, Jackson noticed two types of organic infant formulas that his team hadn’t yet tested in an ongoing study of arsenic in formulas, which had so far turned up only low levels. Results for both turned up levels measuring 20 to 30 times higher than previously tested varieties, and a look at their labels revealed the use of organic brown rice syrup in place of high-fructose corn syrup or other sources of sugar.

To follow up, Jackson and colleagues measured arsenic levels in 17 kinds of infant formula, 29 cereal bars, and three energy shots made for athletes, all bought from local supermarkets.

Of the two formulas made with organic brown rice syrup, one exceeded U.S. drinking water standards, the researchers report today in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. That one was soy-based. A dairy-based, rice-containing variety came in right at those standards. Both exceeded the World Health Organization’s maximum tolerable daily intake level for infants. Formulas made without rice had much lower levels of arsenic.

Arsenic levels were also elevated in energy shots and cereal bars made with rice syrup, rice flakes, rice flour or grains of rice. Eating one bar at the top end of arsenic contamination would supply four micrograms of the mineral, Jackson said, or 40 percent of the limit set for drinking water. Commercially bought rice syrups had concentrations as high as four times greater than drinking water standards.

An estimated 20 percent of people in New England and 25 million people nationwide are already exposed to excessive amounts of arsenic from drinking water taken out of private, unregulated wells, said Joshua Hamilton, a toxicologist and arsenic expert at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Many more are drinking public supplies of water that contain the maximum allowable level of 10 ppb.

As experts continue to debate exactly what levels of arsenic consumption are safe for people, the new findings point to the importance of considering food in addition to drinking water when adding up sources of exposure, Hamilton said. Added together, people might be getting too much.

Concerns are greatest for fetuses, babies and young children, for a variety of reasons. Young people eat and drink more for their size than adults do. They are more sensitive to all kinds of toxins. And studies show that arsenic exposure in the first 10 years of life is riskier than later on.

Many baby foods are made from rice, and scientists have yet to find any rice that doesn’t have arsenic in it, said Hamilton, who recommended that parents avoid feeding excessive amounts of rice-based products to their kids.

He also urged people not to panic, as rice also has health benefits, especially for people who can’t eat wheat or gluten. Arsenic does not accumulate in our bodies, like lead and mercury do. And it’s only chronic daily exposure that goes on for years that really matters.

“People shouldn’t freak out and think, ‘Oh, I had a cup of rice yesterday and something bad is going to happen,’” Hamilton said. “It doesn’t work that way, especially with arsenic.”

“This highlights how little we know about our food and what might be in there,” he added. “It’s something we should all pay more attention to.”

 


New nano-robots made from DNA can transport a precise deadly cargo to unhealthy cells.

The tiny robots bring closer the long-held nanotech dream of a fleet of small robots that can storm the body and kill diseased cells one by one.

“People already know about using antibodies to kill cells,” said Shawn Douglas, a technology fellow at Harvard Medical School’s Wyss Institute, which develops bio-inspired medical materials and devices. “The selective targeting and exposing the payload, that’s the big novel thing.”

Douglas and genetics research fellow Ido Bachelet made the new DNA nano-robots at Harvard with genetics professor George M. Church, known for helping to launch the Human Genome Project. Their research will appear in a forthcoming issue of the journal Science.

First, Bachelet and Douglas wondered if they could combine their respective expertise in immunology and building nanostructures to design a robot that would mimic the body’s immune system. It would recognize infected cells and push their self-destruct buttons.

Previous breakthroughs included a nanoscale cube with a lid debuted in 2009 that self-assembled in a process called “DNA origami.” Adding DNA strands caused the box to open. But Douglas felt that making the box so it got delivered to the right cells would be too difficult. So would making the mechanisms to enter and reprogram the bad cells.

Then Bachelet suggested that they didn’t have to reprogram anything. They just had to make a structure that could deliver the right antibodies to a cell’s surface with a clear message: stop dividing.

“We could actually make an open-ended container and then all it would need to do is just turn itself inside out,” Douglas said.

Their nano-robot is constructed from DNA in a clam shell shape held shut with a special DNA lock. That lock is designed to recognize certain kinds of cancer cells. When it encounters one, the robot springs open and exposes the antibody payload.

So, in the fight against cancer, these nano-robots could be the equivalent of sending SEAL Team Six.

“Our ability to perform that ‘surgical strike’ with nanoscale devices will ultimately allow us to do so in a way that’s safe for the patient,” Douglas said.

“Once we had the idea in mind that we don’t actually need to build some cage that gets inside the cell, we can actually just talk to the surface, we realized that all the other steps solved themselves.”

In the lab, their nano-robot successfully blew up lymphoma and leukemia cells, leaving good cells alone. Doing one of these reactions typically requires 100 billion copies of the robot. In order to start testing their creation on animals, the Harvard postdocs will have to figure out how to scale up to trillions.

Although the nano-robot works in a Petri dish, it will have to be redesigned for a trip through the bloodstream, Douglas said. Modifications are necessary to prevent the particle from getting cleared out by the kidneys or the liver before it has a chance to perform.

“My dream is for one of these devices to ultimately go through clinical trials and become an actual therapeutic that would be a novel treatment for some type of cancer,” Douglas said.

Kurt Gothelf is a professor of chemistry at Aarhus University in Denmark, and the director of the Danish National Research Foundation’s Center for DNA Nanotechnology. He and his colleagues made the self-assembling nanoscale DNA box with a lid in 2009.

“This is one of the things the field has needed, something to show that, hey, this can actually be useful” Gothelf said of the Harvard group’s DNA nano-robot. Although their smart nanodevice isn’t curing cancer yet, it does mark an important step along the way, he added.

“People have been talking a lot about robots that enter your body, and go to a place where something is wrong and fix it,” Gothelf said. “This is the first example that this might come true one day.”

 




panties.com Sexy Lingerie


Click Here to Earn Massive Wealth Online!